The English in Love: The Intimate Story of an Emotional Revolution by Claire Langhamer – review | Books | The Guardian

The English in Love: The Intimate Story of an Emotional Revolution by Claire Langhamer – review | Books | The Guardian.

Dorothy Parker showed me that it was possible to live the life I wanted | Mary Kenny | Comment is free | The Guardian

Dorothy Parker showed me that it was possible to live the life I wanted | Mary Kenny | Comment is free | The Guardian.

Underneath the Pavement—Dancing in the Streets

I came across this review by Simon Callow of Barbara Ehrenreich’s Dancing in the Streets: A History of Collective Joy and thought I’d pass it on.

The book is around five years’ old now. I cite it as a reminder that emotions were once collective experiences. In some places, of course, they still are. But as societies are atomized, increasingly emotions are privatized and we are alone together. [Zygmunt Bauman is good at explaining this.]

This is not a done deal. Nothing is written. It can be changed. For the lost generation on the streets, it’s going to have to change. As the Situationists put it: ‘Underneath the pavement, the beach’.

A note to ‘collective joy’: while our fore bearers may have found joy in dancing, they also found it in those festivals of cruelty that Nietzsche wrote about. Public executions were regarded as a good day out in 18th century England.

William Hogarth, Execution at Tyburn (1747)

William Hogarth, Execution at Tyburn (1747)

Naomi Klein’s ‘No Logo’—10 Years After

I came across a handful of articles in Women Studies Quarterly Volume 38, Numbers 3 & 4, Fall/Winter 2010 and thought I’d pass them on.

For AU students, this link will take you directly to the journal.

For visitors wanting to read them and don’t have access to the journal, drop me a line and I’ll send you a pdf.

Lots of good stuff in this journal.

Emotional labour now

Two books and two reviews:

The first is by Arlie Hochschild—The Outsourced Self: Intimate Life in Market Times. It is reviewed by Rob Horning, ‘Adventures in the Cash Nexus‘, in The New Inquiry.

The second is by Carl Cederstrom and Peter Fleming—Dead Man Working. It is reviewed by John Brissenden, ‘No Fun: Living Death in Emotional Capitalism‘, in New Left Project.

Can we now say that brands have more emotional energy than people?

A short article on Aaron Ben-Ze’ev’s ‘In the Name of Love: Romantic Ideology and its Victims’

The institution of marriage may be in decline, but love is still going strong. In a new book, philosophy professor and University of Haifa president Aaron Ben-Ze’ev explains why.

The article is by Aviva Lori and is called ‘Happily ever after, for at least three years’ and can be found here.

See how Ben-Ze’ev defines ’emotion.